Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy

Efficacy and safety of core stability training on gait of children with cerebral palsy: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis
Huang C, Chen Y, Chen G, Xie Y, Mo J, Li K, Huang R, Pan G, Cai Y, Zhou L. Medicine (Baltimore) 2020; 99(2): e18609.
Affiliation
Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China.
(Copyright © 2020, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)
DOI 10.1097/MD.0000000000018609 PMID 31914039
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common disability in children featured with pathological gait and limb function limitation due to muscle weakness. Improving limb function and quality of life is currently considered to be highlighted. Physiotherapy is a chief component of rehabilitation for children with CP, correcting gait and improve walking capacity through muscle strength training. Standard rehabilitation programs for CP have not been determined. Core stability training (CST), which coordinates limb balance via trunk control, is widely used in sports competition. And it is gradually introduced into the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy with a positive impact on the patients’ gait performance. By screening published literatures, this study aims to conduct a meta-analysis to systematically evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CST in gait of children with CP.

METHODS: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) on CST in the treatment of children with CP were searched from 6 databases. Moreover, the reference lists of conference papers and included literatures will be manually searched to avoid omissions. Literature screening and data extraction were performed independently by 2 researchers. RCTs carry out the risk of bias analysis evaluation from seven aspects through the Cochrane Collaboration’s risk of bias tool. Fixed or random effect model will be performed to analyze the outcomes. When higher heterogeneity occurs (I > 50%), the sensitivity or subgroup analysis will also be conducted to find potential factors. And the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach is used for assessing the quality of evidence.

RESULTS: The study will evaluate the effect of CST on gait of children with CP from multiple outcomes, including walking speed, endurance, stride length, and safety.
CONCLUSION: Based on evidence-based medicine, the conclusion of this study can demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of CST in gait correction for children with CP. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO CRD 42019134094.
Language: en

 

Incidence of falls among adults with cerebral palsy: a cohort study using primary care data
Ryan JM, Cameron MH, Liverani S, Smith KJ, O’connell N, Peterson MD, Anokye N, Victor C, Boland F. Dev. Med. Child Neurol. 2019; ePub(ePub): ePub.
Affiliation
Data Science Centre, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
(Copyright © 2019, Mac Keith Press, Publisher John Wiley and Sons)
DOI 10.1111/dmcn.14444 PMID 31879951
Abstract
AIM: To compare the rate of falls between adults with and without cerebral palsy (CP).
METHOD: We used primary care data on 1705 adults with CP and 5115 adults without CP matched for age, sex, and general practice attended. We compared odds of experiencing a fall between adults with and without CP using conditional logistic regression. We compared the rate of falls using a negative binomial model.

RESULTS: Participants were 3628 males (53%) and 3192 females (47%) (median age 29y, interquartile range 20-42y) at the start of follow-up. Follow-up was 14 617 person-years for adults with CP and 56 816 person-years for adults without CP. Of adults with CP, 15.3% experienced at least one fall compared to 5.7% of adults without CP. Adults with CP had 3.64 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.98-4.45) the odds of experiencing a fall compared to adults without CP. The rate of falls was 30.5 per 1000 person-years and 6.7 per 1000 person-years for adults with and without CP respectively (rate ratio 5.83, 95% CI 4.84-7.02)

INTERPRETATION: Adults with CP are more likely to fall, and fall more often, than adults without CP. The causes and consequences of falls in adults with CP need examination.
Language: en